Business Lunches or Dinners: Who Pays?

Business Lunches or Dinners: Who Pays? Many business relationships are formed or nurtured over a lunch or dinner meeting.  A restaurant for many business people is an extension of their office and can form a major part of how business is conducted. If you entertain clients at a lunch or dinner frequently, it pays to cultivate relationships with certain select restaurants.  By doing so, you will know what to expect from them, and they will know your specific needs. It positions you to have more control over the process and to ensure that you are able to focus your attention on your client or potential business prospect rather than worrying about whether or not your order will be taken in a timely manner, the food is hot enough, or service is professional. Proper business etiquette dictates that whoever asked for the lunch or dinner meeting pays for the meal.  A sophisticated method of handling the cheque being used by savvy business people worldwide is to pay the bill in advance.  Arrive early and ask the maitre d’ to take your credit card and hold the cheque at his or her station where you will go to sign it as ...

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PART 3: From Argentina to Zimbabwe: International Etiquette and Protocol Tips to Master the First Business Meeting

May 14, 2012  |   Blogs,Business Etiquette,Protocol   |     |   0 Comment

PART 3:  From Argentina to Zimbabwe: International Etiquette and Protocol Tips  to Master the First Business Meeting Today’s blog is the final piece to a three-part series that will take you on a global journey to help prepare anyone doing business abroad master introductions and greetings at their first meeting. As noted in part-one, style and form play a major role in successfully conducting business worldwide.  Introductions and greetings are an important element of the style and form so important in your interactions, no matter where your business takes you. So far, our journey has taken us from Canada to Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, India, and Italy. Today we will visit Japan, Mexico, Russia, United Arab Emirates and Zimbabwe. Japan: Greetings are formal and ritualistic in the Japanese workplace. While bowing is an integral part of Japanese culture, and it is used when meeting, showing gratitude, getting attention, expressing sympathy, and apologizing, foreigners are not expected to understand the delicate nuances of this display of respect. When meeting your Japanese counterparts for the first time, the senior person on your team should wait for someone to formally introduce him or her to the eldest or most prominent member of the Japanese team first. S/he should be addressed ...

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PART 2: From Argentina to Zimbabwe: International Etiquette and Protocol Tips to Master the First Business Meeting

May 04, 2012  |   Blogs,Business Etiquette,Protocol   |     |   0 Comment

PART 2:  From Argentina to Zimbabwe: International Etiquette and Protocol Tips  to Master the First Business Meeting This blog is part-two of a three-part series.  It will take you on a global journey to help prepare anyone doing business abroad master introductions and greetings at their first meeting. As noted in part-one, style and form play a major role in successfully conducting business worldwide.  Introductions and greetings are an important element of the style and form so important in your interactions, no matter where your business takes you. Part-one of this series brought us on a journey from Canada to Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Egypt and  France. Today we will visit Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, India, and Italy. Germany: Greet your German counterparts with a firm, brief handshake beginning with the eldest or highest ranked person in the room, and extending to everyone present, even children. Repeat the same gesture upon leaving. Address a colleague using "Herr" ("Mr.") or Frau ("Mrs./Ms.") followed by his/her surname, and wait to be invited to a first-name basis. Because Germans are careful planners, punctuality is important. It demonstrates as much disrespect to be early as to be late—right on time is the way to go. Be sure to plan meetings, including lengthy telephone ...

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